Sunday, February 08, 2015

Snow

Erratically falling,
darting through icy air
landing imperceptibly, piling
up, up, up.
Even tempered - whitening
anything and everything
until, cascading
down, down, down
onto whatever lies below.

As the snow cover all but
the warmest things,
so does the stifling
blanket of darkness
that arrives in waves
unannounced.
Minutes, days, hours
lost in blank uncertainty.

Yet, the light returns.
twilight's gaze lingers
in the western sky
hugging old mountains.
Disappearing into the distance.
forever rolling away
with their promise
of longer days.

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Parenting Notes to Myself

I'm new at this.

Parenting that is.

What has it been, 3.5 years or something? There was a user's manual, right? Oh yeah, there was that "new parents" class we took a few months before the first baby arrived - and I read some things - probably not enough - about what to expect. What stuck with me the most was the variety in terms of color and consistency of infant poop. I took infant & toddler CPR too - which of course terrified me. Before there was a feeling of competence, another child arrived.  Sure. this is how it's done, right?

I recall thinking that there was a certain amount of inter-generational hazing going on, that certain things that our parents and grandparents experienced (the real tough stuff) just went without saying. There were platitudes like, "oh, you'll figure it out" and such - which was true. Maybe, just maybe, if the real truth about being a parent were known, no one would do it. OK, well, maybe not no one, but fewer. What would that mean? Who knows?

I've realized recently that, most of my parenting activities have been underscored with a sense of anxiety and self-doubt. What does that mean? I suppose it means that I constantly self-talk about the "what if...?" scenarios of what we're doing, and whether I'm doing it wrong. What if he gets sick when we visit the play space? What if I'm somehow giving him a complex because I'm doing potty training "wrong"? What if he pukes in the bed again? What if I'm not making enough money to get them the education they deserve (and need?).

What if I cut myself some slack? As a matter of fact, I'm doing OK with the potty training - at least I can clean up poop pretty well - and if it gets on me, I don't freak out. Oh yeah, and I'm not alone in this whole parenting thing, I have a partner. Maybe I would be well-served by sharing these feelings?

I'm realizing that all the worrying and hand-wringing is counter-productive. It undermines my confidence as a parent because I am pretty much figuring it out as I go along - and I can. Most importantly, my ability to be present with my children is severely hampered. If I'm pre-occupied with internally evaluating and criticizing my parenting activities and worrying about it, how am I "there"?

So, when my son asks, "Daddy, will you come play with me?", the answer can simply be, "yes".

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Saving the World from Mediocre Coffee?

People like coffee.  I like coffee.  Good coffee is sublime.  Bad coffee is, well, terrible.  What is mediocre coffee like, and what is saving the world from it like?  I decided to find out.

I listened to a podcast a few weeks ago.  No big deal, right?  It was entitled "Saving the World from Mediocre Coffee" from the London Business School.   The immediate conclusion I drew is that there is no shortage of smart, energetic, and driven people that unite around a problem and solve it.  The reverence with which the participants talked about their "Project Marlow", a global project to automate the cafe experience in the UK and abroad could be admirable...but...I did not feel that way.  Something about it stuck with me, something at its core that I found lacking and/or completely disconnected from "the world".

I felt like the whole thing was misdirected.  Do we really need to save the world from mediocre coffee?  I know I enjoy a good cup daily, and, despite efforts to buy fairtrade/organic/direct trade, there's no doubt I'm impacting the planet with my coffee habit.  Though, I still thought, really?

As I pondered, I determined that what bothered me was the use of the phrase, "saving the world", which, this team is NOT doing.  The proper term might be "saving the target consumer from a mediocre cup of coffee" (though, from a catch-phrase perspective it does not ring out well), and it just so happens that there are hundreds of thousands if not millions of these targets - but please, not the world.  After all, this is a business, and businesses thrive on offering valuable solutions customers want to meet those customers' needs, right?  I suppose they could be saving the world from a mediocre cup of coffee, if they were integrating environmental and social metrics into their project, but I do not recall hearing any of that.

Words are important, and when an organization tosses around "saving/changing the world/planet" what does it really mean?  As a society, what might we decide is truly important to save the world from?  Famine? War? Climate Change? Disease?  Is it up to us to call bulls___ when phrases like this are thrown about?

So, who really is saving the world?  Anyone?

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

What's Working for a BCorp Like?

I started thinking about this a few days ago.  I felt as though I was having a particularly bad day, things weren't going as I'd hoped, road blocks appeared where they were not expected, I was working remotely and feeling disconnected which can easily lead to all kinds of downward-spiraling thoughts.  I paused...and thought about what I was doing and how I was thinking...and then re-framed my internal conversation - "wait", I thought, "I'm working in the renewable energy industry (solar to be exact), in a state with a progressive energy policy (Vermont), in a new job that I found by seeking out an organization that aligned with my vision for what businesses can be, AND it's a Certified BCorp!  How cool is that!"

Working at a BCorp is a lot like working at any other company, you have good days and bad days, days you feel energized and ready to take on the world and days that you'd rather never started.  You have positive and negative interactions with colleagues.  You have challenges and stress and happiness and sadness and everything in between.  But for me, when I paused and thought deeply about what I was obsessing about, what roadblocks had been thrown in my way, I realized that I was part of an organization with a mission I believed in and a structure that seeks to do the right thing in relation to governance, employees, the community, and the environment.  I really could sleep at night knowing that the work I did supported, in a tangible way, making good things happen in the world.

When I look at things that way, whatever obstacles and challenges that rear up seem to fade away rather quickly.

So, thank you Suncommon, for being a certified BCorp.

More to come...

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

22 Lessons from Both Sides of the Hiring Fence

Where are you going?
This could be a long one, so buckle up.

I recently made a career change.   While deep in my own out-of-state exploration phase, I was the hiring manager filling new positions with the company I would eventually leave.  Yes, it felt strange, downright odd, in fact.  Navigating these two competing commitments put me in a unique position to learn about career searching and the hiring process.  In no particular order, here are the things I learned in my concurrent roles as recruiter and candidate (Image from lonestar.edu).
  1. Get OK with yourself - Yep. This could be a doozy - or not.  If you have work to do cleaning up emotional baggage or other mental health challenges - get to it.  The longer you wait the harder it is - and the energy you're dedicating to coping/dealing reduces the energy available to be an authentic participant in your relationships, which deeply affects career exploration. 
  2. Be diligent and unwavering in your vision - When you've arrived at what it is you want, whether it's a specific job, a career move to another industry, or relocating - stick to it.  IF you've been honest and forthright with yourself as you honed in on this vision - your "Why?" - you'll only compromise your long-term happiness by compromising your vision.
  3. Use Pros/Experts - If you can't bear the thought of re-writing your resume, or cover letter writing only sparks anxiety, you might be better off paying to have them done for you, especially if the last time you updated your resume was 10+ years ago.  Shop around.  Ask friends.  Chances are there's a marketing freelancer within your network that can help.
  4. Ask for help - and listen - Who do you know that reflects your opinions back to you honestly - someone you will actually listen to?  What insights do you need about yourself and your capabilities to inform your career exploration?  Maybe a career counselor is the way to go.  Maybe just a close friend that has seem you through personal and professional life phases.  Either way, be sure to truly listen to what they're telling you.
  5. Write a (good) cover letter - I was blown away when I'd receive resumes that were not closely matched to the job description with no letter to explain how they would fit the role.  Why, exactly, are you applying?  Oh. I see. You're wasting everyone's time.  Now, if your cover letter is generic and does not illustrate why you're a great candidate for this job, it's almost as bad as not writing one.
  6. Be brief & concise - This applies to cover letter writing, networking, and other forms of career seeking correspondence.  A hiring manager could be inundated with applicants - a verbose cover letter may never be looked at. A busy professional you've been connected to may skip over a 4 paragraph introductory email and forever lose it below the fold.  Be clear and get to the point...nicely.
  7. Be punctual - Really?  I have to include this?  Yep...because I had a tardy candidate blame traffic.  Look, if traffic is unpredictable in your area then leave ample time and park yourself at a local coffee shop.  The consensus of my peers is that this may not be enough to disqualify you, BUT, as a tiebreaker, you lose.
  8. Follow up - This is important for networking, interviewing, and generally being a nice person (see #12)  Nothing says "I truly appreciate your help" more than actually saying that to the person that helped you in an informational interview.  If you're interviewing for a sales job and you don't ask for the contact info of your interviewer for follow up - you've effectively lowered your odds of winning the job (sale).
  9. Do your homework - 15-30 minutes on the web is probably enough time, though it depends upon how committed you are to a company.  If your goal is to work for a BCorp, then you might want to study up on the history of the movement, along with what the company does.  Jeez, at least read some recent press releases (if they exist).
  10. PROOFREAD! - And have someone else do it too, if you have that access.
  11. Network - Think about what you can offer the people you meet, not just about what you would like to find out.  This was reinforced for me by Markey Read of Career Networks, Inc. Develop your 30-second personal elevator pitch and refine it along the way.  Be sure it's not too vague, people are generally willing to help, they just need you to tell them how they can help.  Too vague a request leaves them unsure of to whom they can connect you, which means you won't get connected.  If you meet someone interesting, stay connected, nurture the relationship, send them occasional notes about things they might find interesting, invite them out for coffee.  Etc.
  12. Dress appropriately - This can be a real challenge if you cannot get a gauge of the organization's culture and typical mode of covering oneself with clothing.  Wearing Casual Friday attire to a law firm could be just as bad as wearing a suit to a organic gardening start-up.  It could illustrate that you might struggle to fit in.  If you have the chance to ask about the office dress through networking, do it.
  13. Practice gratitude -  It not only makes you a happier person, it also reinforces the fact that you care and appreciate the person's help/career opportunity.  Take the time to send a handwritten thank you note to the people that help you along the way.  You're demonstrating your gratitude, and potentially standing out from a sea of applicants.
  14. Include your contact info - repeatedly - A cover letter with no name, address, email, phone number? Really?  Yes.  It happened.  Make it easy to find you, name the files you're submitting online with your name and the position (think about how the recipients will be organizing and searching for electronic documents).  Make sure your name, email, and phone are included on every page you submit.  Make it easy to find and contact you.
  15. Join Professional groups - Looking to make a career change/industry change?  Look for professional organizations in your new industry and join them.  Get active online or in person, ask questions.  Tell people your story and share your goals - you'll find the help you need.
  16. Engage in and with social media - OK, depending upon your generation, privacy concerns and the like, this might be tough.  Though, if you're seeking to work in marketing for a consumer products company, you should probably be up to speed on Facebook, twitter, Instagram, and the like.  Follow the organizations you're interested and engage with their content, you'll get a feel for their culture and you never know how this could help.  Oh! And make sure your profiles are up to date and neat.  You may also want to look through your taggings on Facebook to clean up and transgressions that you'd prefer others not see.
  17. Manage expectations - Get a clear view of your transition timing.  Expectations for the time period to give when you give notice vary, typically ~2 weeks for most employees and ~4-6 weeks for managers, maybe far longer in academia and executive levels.  While you may be eager to start your new adventure, be clear with your prospective employer about expectations and time lines for a transition to maintain your professional reputation.
  18. Update your resume/career accomplishments as you go - Few things can be as daunting as updating/recreating your resume/CV after many years of neglect.  So, as with other professional activities, update it as you go.  Take the time to reflect on your last role and record the what's and hows for your resume as well as more detailed information in another document to draw upon for future interviews and career exploration.  If you maintained a good relationship with a former employer, follow up with someone after they've filled your position and see how it's progressed - it's possible that you laid the groundwork for a project that achieved its full potential.  
  19. Think about your career narrative - The term "climbing the corporate ladder" is less applicable today than ever.  Look at your next career/job choice as a chapter of the career novel (or eBook) you're writing.  How does it mesh with what you've done in the past?  How does it build on your experiences?  How does it reflect your ambitions and who you want to be in the world?
  20. Coordinate social media posts with your partner -  In this day and age of interconnections, make sure that you and anyone else that may need to navigate a career transition is aware of and approves of social media sharing.  You never know who might be connected to whom and spill the beans in a most inopportune way.
  21. Be honest and nice in an exit interview - There's not much in it for you to launch into a flaming excoriation of a manager or (soon to be) former coworker upon exiting.  Of course, situations vary and depending upon the organization, you may feel compelled to offer feedback to help them improve, do so honestly and judiciously.
  22. Try something different -I do not have direct experience with this, but I've read about the guy that rented a billboard in London to land a job.  Depending upon your situation, resources, and industry, something like this could be the right thing to do.
So, to all the HR professionals out there, what did I miss?  For hiring managers and career changers, what have you experienced?  I'm curious.

Sunday, January 12, 2014

When an Idea Gives You Goosebumps

Yes.  It happened.  Last summer. I had a phone conversation about an idea and I got goosebumps.  If I can't pay attention to that visceral reaction as a sign of resonance with my ideals, visions, and dreams, what can I pay attention to?

The part that's interesting to me, as I reflect on the moment months later, is the fact that it's an idea I had about four years ago and abandoned.  Oh, it popped up a few times, in conversations with people about what I was trying to do, a few fits and starts with a co-developer and such, but - yeah - I gave up on it.

Why?

Oh, there are plenty of reasons - having a child, letting the internal critic squash it, no clue how to execute, fear of failure, trying to figure it out myself, the economy, the temperature, star misalignment...

Am I happy that someone's doing something with it?  I am.

What did I learn?

Actions speak louder than words - ideas are not owned - and, the Universe might bring something back to you whether you like it or not.

In this year of letting things go, what's getting in the way of letting my passion shine through - to be present in and with these moments?

Wednesday, January 01, 2014

The Year of Letting It Go

Yeah. A jacket like this.
I finally did it.

I took my father's 25-ish year old leather biker jacket to a nearby second-hand retail/swap establishment - and got rid of it.

Unceremoniously stuffed into the back of a closet, pushed back amid the items that should probably no longer be with us - it was out of sight and not quite out of mind.  What the heck was I doing with it?  And, as I contemplated a 2014 in which I planned to let things both emotional and material go - where did this belong?

Not with me anymore.

I was carting it around without a clue as to what to do with it and what purpose it served.  Did having it with me provide some shred of his presence? Humbug. He passed away 22 years ago - his jacket was just a jacket. Was I going to do something with it as a memorial?  Probably not.  (I had a quick idea about adding a permanent QR-code to it with some sort of online photo-log where people would post photos of themselves during far-flung adventures wearing the jacket - think of it like wearable garden gnome.  Yeah...I never did anything with that.)

So, there I was, at Buffalo Exchange in Davis Square, talking to the super-hip and fully-vintaged clerk about the fact that this was a real biker jacket worn by a real biker.  I mean, this thing is legit (I think he wore it on his trip to Sturgis, SD in the late 80's).  She commented on the coolness of the button holes in the leather and the broken zipper - sure signs of use.  Off she went for a consultation on the value - like Antiques Roadshow - and came back to fill me in.  Interesting.  I let it go...

Is it odd that an urban hipster could be striding around Boston/Cambridge/Somerville in my deceased father's jacket?  Maybe.  It's hard to imagine an area more different than where my father lived and felt at ease. In fact, I'd bet he would strongly dislike the hipster set - but then again, he'd be happy that I ended up with a few bucks in my pocket for an old leather-bound keepsake - and that someone used it.

It's an object - nothing more - the memories remain.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

The Horror of it All

This is a bit of a departure...

Breaking down in tears in my workplace cafeteria is not something I expect to happen.

Then I saw this photo is today's Wall Street Journal.

Something about this hit me remarkably hard, like a sucker punch from the World.  I'm not pretending that senseless, brutal, accidental, and random things don't happen daily, they happen all the time, this one just hit me and hit me hard.

Maybe it's the look of anguish on the man's face.

Maybe it's the limp and bloody figure he's carrying - snuffed out far too soon.

Maybe it's the feeling of helplessness as I sit comfortably at my office computer.

More than anything, I think, it's a feeling of utter despair - whether or not the photo is of a father-and-son, I place myself in a scene where I carry my son's limp and lifeless body and I wonder if I could go on.  It's not a good though to sit with, and I am happy that it will pass and fortunate that, for now, I am not in a situation where I fear for my family's safety.

I'm not pretending to judge the who's "right" and who's "wrong" in the Syrian conflict.  What I know is that this image is one in a long line of images, some physical, some mental, dating back to time immemorial, of the cruelty mankind can inflict upon others, both in the immediate and long-term.

But, mankind can be thoughtful, caring, empathetic, and loving too - I need to remember that.

Now, back to my life - changed in some way that I might not recognize.

Friday, November 15, 2013

Locally Focused Gift Registry Launches

I have had the good fortune to meet incredible people in my 10+ year journey of seeking to understand "sustainability".  One of those people is the Founder and CEO of a new company that has the potential to "scale" the interest in putting our dollars to work building resilient local businesses.  Her name is Allison Grappone, the company is Nearby Registry, and I'm thrilled to be a member of her advisory team.

The most exciting news for the organization was their November 7th appearance on MSNBC's Your Business.

Watch the MSNBC Segment
I learned something new in the segment. While I'm familiar with the benefits of supporting locally owned businesses to keep dollars circulating locally - building economic resilience - what I had not thought of was the potential for NR to connect seasonal visitors with the places they frequent and love, as one of the interviewees envisioned.  Imagine, someone living in New York City that summers in the Finger Lakes Region could create a holiday wish list comprised of items both from the neighborhood in NYC where they love as well as the funky bookshop or craft boutique they love to visit in the summer.  What a great idea!

Here's what they have kept in the local NH economy since their launch.  At first glance, it may not seem like much, but when you factor in the local business multiplier effect, These 8000 individual dollars (through November 15th) are working hard to support resilient local communities.

So, take a few minutes and visit their site and think about the stores in your neighborhood that you'd like to be a part of Nearby Registry.  Create a wishlist.  If you're more excited about bringing them to your city or town, join their Instagram campaign - snap a photo of your favorite store that simply has to be part of Nearby Registry, tag it with #joinnearby, and send it to @nearbyregistry - let your local voice be heard!  Heck, share it on facebook, twitter, G+, whatever you like.  You can always email them too, at happtohelp@nearbyregistry.com.

Nearby Registry will be, well, nearby, before you know it.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

A Dose of Wholesome Business Goodness - in Vermont

Check out the "Making Dough and Making Change" event pageWhen you have the opportunity to see leaders from Ben and Jerry's, Ashoka, The Guardian Sustainable Business, VBSR, Echoing Green, B Lab, and Calvert Investments share a stage to share big ideas about social entrepreneurship - it's best to take it.

That's how I found myself about 3.5 hours away from my home late last month (with the latest IPCC draft report due out in a few days) hosted by UVM's new Sustainable Entrepreneurship MBA Program surrounded by sustainable business, social justice, alternative economy, and local-advocates.  I could practically feel the goodness (or good intentions) all around me - and I liked it.  I felt, if only for a few hours, that I was with my tribe, a tribe I first found and connected with for the two years I attended BGI.

I was ready for my dose of Wholesome Business Goodness Kool-Aid...and I got it.

So, here's who was there (I've included links to the event page on the VBSR website as well as to the participant's BIOs for those that would like more information):
Wow! On top of this stellar line up, I noticed people in the audience from organizations that I've had the good fortune to learn about over the past 10 years or so (some more recently) -Suncommon, Preserve Products, VT Resilience Lab, Vermonters for a New Economy, Shelburne Farms, AllEarth Renewables, Renewable NRG Systems, and many more.

So, what did I learn?  Good question.  With all the tweeting I was doing (multi-tasking), and not sitting still, I noticed that my listening, though-synthesizing, and note-taking suffered.  Regardless of this fact, here are a few tidbits I gleaned from the panelists that I found interesting, if not revelatory:
  1. The people on the ground experiencing a problem and the repercussions of the problems, are the ones most passionate about solving them - and possibly the best able to solve them (with the right resources). While I am sure there are passionate people solving problems they have not experienced, direct experience provides a level of engagement and systemic understanding that someone just a few steps removed will not understand.  There are other people or organizations that can surely support this person in solving the problem - since it will align with their own interests.  Cheryl Dorsey prompted this thought as she shared Echoing Green's "Darwinian qualification" process for evaluating early-stage on-the-ground social change initiatives for investment.
  2. We've come a long way, and there is still a long way to go Daryn Dodson mentioning the 50th anniversary of the Walk on Washington, and asked for a show of hands for how many people paused to remember it.  I felt the air go out of the room - did we forget?  Have we solved the social justice problem of racism?  I don't think so - and it's gotten better...right?  
  3. The high-minded mission statements and values charts so many leadership teams agonize over may go misinterpreted, sporadically followed, or simply forgotten when filtered down through the organization to the people "getting things done".  That's not to say that organizational leaders don't get things done - it's different.  We witnessed a great example when a - some would tweet "brave" - long-time supplier of Ben and Jerry's quizzed Mr. Solheim, "How do you define "shared prosperity" for your suppliers; 10% gross margin, 20%?"  It was a great question, illuminating the reality of a purchasing department's goal to reduce costs colliding with a company mission of sharing success. 
  4. Wit and laughter is a good way to deal with what seem to be insurmountable problems.  Jo Confino and Jay Coen Gilbert demonstrated this well, with what could have been deemed "cutting" banter in the typical across-the-Atlantic-UK-v.-US way as they talked about species extinctions, weather extremes, and sea-level rise.
  5. If you have a belief - stand up and advocate for it because nobody else will.  Andrea Cohen, VBSR's Executive Director reinforced this as she addressed business leaders in the audience.  If a business has a "personality", perhaps echoing that of its founder(s) and/or employees depending upon its size, does it therefore hold "beliefs"?  And if so, why wouldn't it advocate for things aligned with those beliefs?
  6. Is "scaling" anything a symptom of our current thinking and therefore counter to solving the problems we're working on?  I can't help but think that we're missing something when we seek to "scale" a solution.  Yes, we need big ideas and world-changing actions, but just "going bigger" seems misguided.  I was glad to see a member of a COOP ask the panel about COOPs' place in our brave new sustainable and socially just world.
If you're curious about the play-by-play as interpreted by me and many other interested parties in the twittersphere, take a look at the #SocEntSummit twitter hashtag.

Oh, one more thing - this would have been a good way for me to try PickUpPal.  Next time.