Friday, August 26, 2005

Nine States Unite to Cut Greenhouse Gases

Officials in nine Northeastern states have reached a preliminary agreement to cap and then cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by 10% by 2020, a Delaware official said Wednesday. If the agreement is made final, it would be the first of its kind in the United States.

I learned about this topic when I attended the CERES Building Equity, Reducing Risk conference in April of this year while still a member of Beacon Power. The session on theRegional Greenhouse Gas Initiative is listed below. It all started in 2003 with a letter from NY Governor George Pataki to eleven governors from Maine to Maryland. The concept was to join the states together to investigate the implementation of a regional cap-and-trade CO2 emissions trading scheme to reduce CO2 emissions. If the past is any indication of the future, states lead the way when it comes to regulations. With some energy companies lobbying for a national policy on CO2 emissions, to reduce uncertainty and therefore risk as they seek to build new electricity generation assets, this regional effort may be a national public policy trendsetter.
Northeast Regional Climate Action: What Does it mean for Businesses and Investors?
As eight states in the northeast work collaboratively to develop a greenhouse gas cap and trade program, this workshop will explore the implications for businesses and investors. How will the program be implemented? Which companies stand to gain and lose? What will it mean for the region's economy?

Ashok Gupta, Director, Air/Energy Program, Natural Resources Defense Council
Sonia Hamel, Special Assistant, Massachusetts Office for Commonwealth Development
Seth Kaplan, Director, Clean Energy/Climate Change Program, Conservation Law Foundation
Adam Markham, Executive Director, Clean Air-Cool Planet
Robert Teetz, Keyspan
It is appropriate that I started reading Michael Crichton's State of Fear a few weeks ago. I am not much of a fan of these types of books, but the writer's subject matter, climate change/global warming, is of interest to me. Public opinion is affected by information from all media sources, whether they be fiction, non-fiction, or somewhere in between. I would not go as far as saying that Mr. Crichton is completely panning climate change, but it is clear that he intends to cast some doubt on the scientific foundation of "global warming". I am interested to see how the novel plays out

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